OUR ANIMALS

We added animals to our farm in August of 2020. The purpose of having animals on our farm is to aid in the fertility of our soil so we produce highly nutritious foods. We also are conservators at heart and have animals that are on danger lists and at risk for going extinct. Everyone on the farm has a job and meaningful purpose. 

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Maitu & Kora

Meet our AKPR kunekune piglets, Kora and Maitu. One of the goals we have had for the farm since its conception is to be a regenerative farm. We want to use animals and farming methods that help us create an ecosystem that works for each other, not against it. Using nature as it was intended!

Pigs are beneficial in many ways. First, they love to eat and our farm needs them so they can graze our fields and build back up a healthy layer of grasses so our fields retain more water (this process takes years, but its worth the effort). They also enjoy all the snacks that come back from market that didn't make it into your homes. They loveeeee zucchini!

We chose kunekune pigs for lots of reasons! They are one of the most docile breeds and you can pretty much treat them like dogs, including snuggles. They also don't root the ground as much as other breeds.

Kunekune pigs originate from New Zealand and almost went extinct. They came to the US in the late 90s and were no longer considered headed for extinction in 2010. We decided to name them with traditional Māori names to honor the Māori culture who discovered New Zealand and the kunekune. In Māori, kunekune means "fat and round." Kora means "companion" and Maitu means "gift from god." We are so lucky to have them. 

We will breed them and have piglets to sell around spring time of 2021. We are registered American Kunekune Pig breeders with the AKPR. Watch for announcements! 

The Chickens

We have two different chicken breeds on our farm: Swedish flower hens and Asian chickens.

 

Swedish flower hens are the largest breed of chickens native to Sweden. In the late 1980's there were less than 500 Swedish Flower Hens left in Sweden. This is why we've chosen them for our farm, so we can continue to help the breed grow. Swedish Flower Hens have beautiful, complex feather patterns. Their eggs are a beautiful tan color. They make excellent farm birds because they are calm and not aggressive towards caretakers. 

Asian chickens are a relatively new breed of chickens which are excellent egg layers. Their eggs are typical medium sized brown eggs. At first glance the chickens appear to be all black but they have a beautiful blue and red sheen under light. They are also calm and not aggressive birds and don't mind the occasional handling. 

Our birds are free range and enjoy stretching their wings on the farm. They have the vital job of fertilizing our soil and scratching for bugs. We feed our birds soy free, whole grain, raw, organic chicken feed. 

Find our farm fresh eggs in the shop for $6 a dozen. 

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The Ducks

We have two different duck breeds on our farm: Blue Swedish Ducks and Khaki Campbell Ducks.

 

Blue Swedish Ducks are on 'watch' status with the livestock conservancy. Blue Swedish ducks are hardy ducks that were popularized in Europe. They prefer to forage in orchards, grass, and eat natural foods. They produce a white egg with a blueish tint. They make great pets as they have a calm temperament. 

Our Khaki Campbell Ducks are also on the 'watch' list with the livestock conservancy. Mrs. Adele Campbell of Gloucestershire, England, developed this breed late in the 1800s. Campbells are prolific layers and active foragers.

Our birds are free range and enjoy stretching their wings on the farm. They have the vital job of fertilizing our soil and scratching for bugs. We feed our birds soy free, whole grain, raw, organic chicken feed. 

Find our farm fresh eggs in the shop for $6 a dozen. 

Ylva, Salla, & Priya 

THE ICELANDIC SHEEP 

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The Icelandic sheep is an ancient North European breed, slightly smaller than modern varieties, whose double-layered coat is uniquely suited to cold and wet conditions. They’re not an ‘improved breed,’ so you’re dealing with the same sheep that were running around Iceland during the Viking times. In Iceland they are raised primarily for their meat, but the wool is a valuable byproduct. Icelandic Sheep have a double layered coat. The inner layer, or thel, is insulating, superlight and very airy, while the outer layer, or tog, is long, strong and water repellent. Carded together, these two layers make lopi, versatile wool used to knit lopapeysa, the distinctive traditional Icelandic sweater of concentric rings. We will be using our sheep for grazing our fields and hopefully in the future using their wool. We may also potentially breed in a few years time but for now they are working on our fields eating as much as their hearts content!